BCM 441 Reflection Posts

Capstone Project: Influenza

Influenza, or the flu, is a common and highly contagious viral infection. While severity of infection varies year-to-year, the CDC estimates that there are between 9 million and 45 million cases of influenza in the United States alone each year. This post discusses the basic biochemistry of the influenza virus.

Literature Overview: Influenza (H1N1)

Reflection Blog #3 Influenza, though only first making a prominent appearance in the scientific literature around the early nineteenth century, has plagued humanity since at least the 1500s. 5 Given this, its scientific study extends far back, easily preceding identification of the first virus, and resulting in a somewhat overwhelming abundance of literature. I have …

Influenza A, Subtype H1N1

CAPSTONE PROJECT LANDING PAGE

Influenza, though only first making a prominent appearance in the scientific literature in the early nineteenth century, has plagued humanity since at least the 1500s. Given this, its scientific study extends far back, easily preceding identification of the first virus, and resulting in a somewhat overwhelming abundance of literature. I have chosen to focus on H1N1 for this project, though it is common that scientific understanding of the H1N1 subtype is informed by studies in other influenza strains or virology at large.

Presented below are four core themes, and two less prominent, supplementary themes*, which describe the nature of biochemical research in H1N1 and influenza available. Click on a link below to get started!

  1. Clinical Characterization
  2. Identification and Characterization of the Causative Agent
  3. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Infection 
  4. Host Immunity & Preserving the Healthy State
  5. Treatment, Prevention, & Transmission 
  6. Examining Genetic Factors & Predispositions*

About Me

I am a junior Biochemistry major at Muhlenberg College from Santa Cruz, California. I am on the pre-med track, but I have strong research interests as well. At Muhlenberg, I participate in biochemistry research with Dr. Colabroy where we study an enzyme involved in the Lincomycin biosynthesis pathway, in hopes of elucidating valuable mechanistic and kinetic insight with possible applications for novel syntheses.